Gloworm Tunnel - Wollemi National Park

The 600-metre tunnel was bored through the sandstone in 1907 as part of the Newnes railway line that served the Newnes Oil Shale mines that operated during the early 20th century. The railway was closed in 1932 and the rails were pulled out of the tunnel.
The tunnel is now within the Wollemi National Park and is a popular attraction for bushwalkers and tourists. In addition to the glow worms, the area features spectacular gorges, caves and scenery. The site is maintained by the National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Gloworm Tunnel - Wollemi National Park Gloworm Tunnel - Wollemi National Park Gloworm Tunnel - Wollemi National Park Gloworm Tunnel - Wollemi National Park

After the railway was pulled up, glow-worms made their home in this abandoned tunnel. While glow-worms occur in various other places throughout the Blue Mountains, the curve of this tunnel makes it sufficiently dark to be one of the few places to see them during daylight hours. (Yes, you will need a torch; see note below.) To see the glow-worms, turn off torches and remain silent. They will appear after a short wait. Please do not disturb the glow-worms in any way.

Gloworm Tunnel - Wollemi National Park Gloworm Tunnel - Wollemi National Park Gloworm Tunnel - Wollemi National Park Gloworm Tunnel - Wollemi National Park

The Newnes railway line (also called Wolgan Valley Railway) is a closed and dismantled railway line in New South Wales, Australia. The line ran for 32 mi (51 km) from the Main Western line to the township of Newnes. The line was constructed and operated by the Commonwealth Oil Corporation for their Newnes Oil Shale mine. Surveying and construction was overseen by Henry Deane.
The line opened in 1907 and closed in 1932. It was primarily intended to carry goods to and from the mine but also provided passenger services. The steep 1 in 25 (4%) gradients along the descent towards Newnes required a different type of steam locomotive. 4 Shay locomotives were imported from the Lima Locomotive Works in the USA. Although rather slow, their unique build which uses crankshafts to propel the wheels made them very suitable, and if a train had to stop on a steep uphill grade, the train could easily start again and keep moving.

Gloworm Tunnel - Wollemi National Park Gloworm Tunnel - Wollemi National Park Gloworm Tunnel - Wollemi National Park Gloworm Tunnel - Wollemi National Park

Source: tpg.com.au / wikipedia